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Posts tagged ‘Work’

The new Purple Guide is now online

Event organisers will be (or at least should be) very familiar with the Purple Guide – it has provided guidance across a range of subjects from crowd management to fireworks, medical provision to waste management, and so on, since 1993.

Over the last couple of years the HSE have undergone consultation with industry practitioners and have together drawn up a new version.

The new Purple Guide is available now (in draft) online:

**UPDATE – the draft version online is closed now ** (01/2014)

www.thepurpleguide.co.uk 

From the site:

“The Purple Guide to Health, Safety and Welfare at Music and Other Events (Draft) has been drawn up by the Events Industry Forum in consultation with the UK events industry, including representatives from regional and national Government. This publication is designed to replace the original ‘Purple Guide’ (HSG195) which was originally published by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) in consultation with the industry.

 Covering both legislation and good practice, this new guide has been designed to sign-post event organisers and suppliers to the practices and issues that need to be considered when events are being organised. The contents are not designed to be prescriptive and those using this guidance should undertake appropriate risk assessments and evaluations to evaluate the specific requirements of the specific events they are organising or involved with.”

Recording sessions offer at the NCEM York

As part of my work with the National Centre for Early Music in York we are opening the doors and encourage more people to come in to use the lovely, inspiring, bright, airy space.

One of the uses of the venue that suits really well – with its lovely acoustics, sound proofing and studio facilities is recording sessions (either studio style or with a small live audience.)

From Jan to March 2013 NCEM is offering a 30% its day rate (info below.)

Having used the space myself for recording projects i’d happily chat through the potential in the space but it is certainly well worth a look!

 

From the NCEM promo:

As we sink into the winter months The National Centre for Early Music has a warming offer on recording sessions at our beautiful St. Margaret’s Church in York: 30% off the standard hire day rate on any booking taking place until 31st of March 2013. www.ncem.co.uk/recordings

Together with the stunning natural acoustics of this inspiring space, few other medieval churches could offer such a warm welcome at this time of year. Renovated to an exceptional standard in 2000, the space boasts triple glazing, silent under floor heating, dedicated artists facilities, soundproofing and acoustic treatment to tailor your sound.

As a concert venue for 180 people the space suits more intimate ensembles perfectly. Either for live recordings or for studio sessions the space adapts well and allows you to shut out the world and focus on creating beautiful work.

With a range of well maintained early music keyboard instruments – see www.ncem.co.uk/instrument-hire for details; there is little to complicate your time or arrangements. We are able to offer a range of support services too from session engineers to catering and accommodation.

The venue is well used by a wide variety of early music specialists (as well as jazz, folk and contemporary musicians) and recordings this past year include John Potter and Christopher O’Gorman (Hyperion) and Profeti della Quinta – winners of the 2011 York Early Music International Young Artists Competition (Linn).

BBC Radio 3 use the NCEM to broadcast live their annual Early Music Show from York and artists recorded by BBC Radio 3 for broadcast in 2012 include countertenor Iestyn Davies, Phantasm, Gallicantus with lutenist Elizabeth Kenny with artists for 2013 already booked to include Paul O’Dette, Ensemble Medusa with Patrizia Bovi and Fabio Bonizonni.

The BBC Music Magazine’s review of John Potter & Christopher O’Gormans ‘Conductus – Music and Poetry from Thirteenth Century France’ Recording (autumn 2012) gives great testament to the value of the church here at the NCEM:

‘Conductus proves that ascetic simplicity can be as deeply moving and aesthetically breath-taking as the most complex, heart-on-sleeve music … It’s hardly necessary to mention that the performances are superb, their precise diction well-served by Jeremy Summerly’s production and Julian Millard’s engineering. The sound is intimate yet resonant, closely-focused and detailed yet with an ambience vividly suggesting spaciousness’ (BBC Music Magazine)

 If you’d like to take advantage of our 30% discount on our daily hire rate (reducing the venue fees to £280 +VAT!) do please get in touch, we’d love to hear from you. Contact: gill.baldwin@ncem.co.uk or 01904 632220.

www.ncem.co.uk/recordings

 

‘The History Man’ – from The Stage newspaper

In the briefest moment of something falling between vanity and self promotion, i thought i’d share this article with you that was first published in The Stage newspaper on 16th of August 2012. It sheds a bit of light on what i spent a good chunk of the summer doing and Kevin frames my role and my approach in very positive terms too!

The venue for York Mystery Plays 2012 is the city’s museum gardens. Kevin Berry speaks to event manager Ben Pugh about overcoming difficulties with building a theatre in the round on an archaeological site.

“On site there was nothing – other than a very beautiful setting,” says Ben Pugh. “Everything had to come in from scratch and we have erected a state of the art, 1,400-seat venue on a sensitive historical site”

The site is York Museum Gardens and the venue he mentions will stage the York Mystery Plays throughout August. York Theatre Royal, Riding Lights Theatre Company and York Museums Trust are producing the plays with support from York Council.

The Theatre Royal production team has vast experience in working off site, with The Railway Children at the National Railway Museum, and is substantially reconfiguring its traditional auditorium to create a theatre in the round for summer seasons.

Pugh is the event manager for the Mystery Plays charged with supervising the erection of what amounts to an actual theatre on a site governed by the severest constraints. No digging allowed – “We can’t touch the monument” – and certainly no access for articulated trucks. Over 300 tons of scaffolding was off-loaded outside York and then shuttled in on smaller vehicles.

York Museum Gardens is a public park used by 10,000 people every day during the summer, and Pugh and his team have had to close off a third of that space. In the garden’s ten acres there is a protected English Heritage monument (the Benedictine St Mary’s Abbey), a busy museum and botanical gardens.

The sheer enormity of the task faced by Pugh’s team becomes apparent as he continues talking. It is difficult to take in. Getting the number of people involved, nearly 2,000 community players, and managing them, even in these days of mobile phones and emails, has been quite a challenge. The genial Pugh, who appears to take everything in his stride, suggests “thinking of the usual theatrical process and then times it by 2,000”

Have the vehicles been churning up the ground? After all, York has had its share of rain in recent weeks.

“We have a three metre-wide metal track way running from the road to the stage site,” Pugh says. “The gateway is part of the scheduled monument and is three metres wide. We’ve had to be very steady, coordinated and careful. We needed the track to guard against the weather, and also there’s a lot of buried archaeology just under the surface. While many events this year have been undone by the weather, we’ve been fine on this site.”

In the theatre there is a one foot rise between each row of seats and everyone will have a good view, plus there is a roof over the audience. The theatre is already two metres off the ground so there is a substantial sub-stage area for actors and staff to come up through trap doors and use rising stairways. Pugh emphasises that his team has had to build an entire venue: dressing rooms, toilet blocks, putting in water pipes, indeed all of the infrastructure needed in the theatre.

“We are presenting ourselves with a whole load of practical and logistical challenges to give ourselves that creative freedom in the space,” says Pugh. “We have been keen to get the community involved and that has brought forth amazing creative energy.”

He talks of a fusion of techniques and approaches and the sharing of them. Members of the community who may be painters and decorators coming in to paint the scenery, people who go to embroidery class once a week helping with costumes.

“We’re working with Star Events Group and they’re re-engineered their seating principles to enable us to have a fluid, flexible theatre space,” Pugh explains. “They’ve never built on a site like this. We asked them for a whole load of things to make it a theatre – such as entrance ways and tunnels and things they wouldn’t normally do.”

Getting into the site and setting up has taken a month. Getting out will take three weeks, a time scale that Pugh has insisted on.

“I’ve been able to persuade English Heritage and the Museums Trust that giving us more time to do it, steadily and carefully, will reduce the chance of anything happening,” he says, “The worst case scenario is people going in there mob-handed and trying too hard and doing things way too quickly.”

That will not happen with Pugh in charge. A York resident for nearly 15 years he is aware of what the Mystery Plays mean to the people of his city. They are deeply embedded in the city’s culture.

We had been speaking in the week leading up to the premiere. “People on the site have been saying how relaxed I look,” he said, smiling. “So it must be going well.”

York Mystery Plays run until august 27. The plays will be streamed live over the internet via The Space, the digital arts media service, thanks to Pilot Theatre and ACE funding.

Thanks Kevin!!

‘what was the raghu dixit track sung on the andrew marr show on 15 april 2012?’

Turns out that one of the key search engine terms pointing people towards my website at the moment is:

‘what was the raghu dixit track sung on the andrew marr show on 15 april 2012?’

So i thought i’d better answer the question!

Raghu sang ‘I’m in Mumbai waiting for a miracle’ – From the Album Antaragni – The Fire Within (iTunes link).

If you enjoyed Raghu’s performance on the Andrew Marr show you can watch it again here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-17720101 (BBC web link)

and you might like to have a look / listen to the EP we recorded together last summer at the National Centre for Early Music in York.

You can read more about the project here

or you can download the live EP from iTunes – Unplugged (Live in York) – Raghu Dixit

If you are in london you might like to come down to the South Bank Centre for Raghu’s concert with members of Bellowhead as part of the Alchemy Festival.

Great winter jazz deal at the NCEM

The NCEM is a great venue for jazz – this sunday afternoon deal is well worth considering:

Jazz Winter Warmers

Jazz lovers check out the new jazz Winter Warmers offer allowing you to hear three great Sunday afternoon concerts at the National Centre for Early Music for the price of two, whilst enjoying a free glass of wine or beer!

Offer ends Friday 14 October – Please ring 01904 658338 to book

McCormack & Yarde Duo
Sunday 23 October | 4.00pm | £15.00

John Parricelli & Huw Warren
Sunday 6 November | 4.00pm | £15.00

John Etheridge & Chris Garrick
Sunday 20 November | 4.00pm | £15.00

To book for this offer please ring the Box Office on 01904 658338 open Monday-Friday 9am-5pm (please note the offer is not available to buy online).

In order to receive this offer you need to buy all your tickets at the same time. Please note that this offer applies to full price tickets only (full price tickets are £15.00 for each concert).

The Angel Awards: Former Church of St Margaret of Antioch, Leeds

Really pleased to hear today that Left Bank Leeds have been shortlisted for an English Heritage Angel Award.

The English Heritage Angel Awards, supported by Andrew Lloyd Webber and the Telegraph, celebrate the best efforts to rescue listed buildings, properties and National Trust sites based on the English Heritage at Risk register.

You can see the article on line here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/angel-awards/8765948/The-Angel-Awards-Former-Church-of-St-Margaret-of-Antioch-Leeds.html

and find out more about Left Bank here:

http://www.leftbankleeds.org.uk/

Great Project!

Artist from Yorkshire awarded commission for final round of Cultural Olympiad programme, Unlimited

The news below is reposted from the Arts Council news letter.

I’m really pleased to be working as the producer on this show with Jez and Mind the Gap.

Jez Colborne and Mind the Gap in Bradford have been awarded funding in the final round of Unlimited Commissions. Unlimited is the ground-breaking Cultural Olympiad programme that celebrates arts and culture by disabled and deaf artists on an unprecedented scale. It is supported by the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, Arts Council England, the UK Arts Councils and the British Council.

Irresistible is a ‘symphony of sirens’, a musical experience that combines warning sirens, non-traditional instruments and singing voices. Devised by Jez Colborne, a multi-talented composer, musician and performer, in collaboration with Mind the Gap, Jez is now developing this work further, after it received funding in the first round of Unlimited Commissions.

Commenting on the award, Jez said: ‘I feel really proud to be part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad! The show feels Olympian, it’s about heroes and the journeys they go through to complete a challenge.’

The open-air piece will be performed at The Cow & Calf on Ilkley Moor in West Yorkshire and around London’s South Bank as part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.